Latest news https://www.visionaustralia.com.au/ en LEAPing into employment and leadership: LEAP 2021 Graduation Ceremony https://www.visionaustralia.com.au/community/news/2021-12-06/leaping-employment-and-leadership-leap-2021-graduation-ceremony <span>LEAPing into employment and leadership: LEAP 2021 Graduation Ceremony </span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/376" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">matt.collins</span></span> <span>Mon, 12/06/2021 - 17:02</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Storytelling, speaking with confidence and clarity, emotion management, organisation, and timekeeping are just some of the skills LEAP (Learn, Engage, Act, Perform) 2021 participants have worked hard to learn and practice this year.</p> <p>Wowing their audience and showing how far their public speaking skills have progressed, participants completed their final LEAP activity, a three-minute presentation on a topic of their choice.</p> <p>“Discovering my bravery and confidence”, “A crash course on car engines”, and “All about the raspberry pi's” are some of the fascinating presentations participants shared with us.</p> <p>Elated with their achievements, participants took to the (virtual) stage to celebrate their graduation from the LEAP 2021 program.</p> <p>LEAP program coordinator, Claire Nolan, shared her experience with this year’s LEAP program.</p> <p>“It has been my privilege to watch as each participant’s confidence grew during the program. Armed with new skills in how to get a job, be a leader, and take on responsibility, our LEAP 2021 graduates are ready to achieve their big goals,” Claire said.</p> <p>“I am thrilled so many graduates have already started to apply for part-time jobs, put their hand up for public speaking opportunities, or have enrolled in tertiary studies.”</p> <p>Prepared with new skills in public speaking, job searching, resume writing, interviewing, networking, and emotional intelligence, as well as new friends from all across Australia, LEAP 2021 graduates are ready to tackle their personal and professional goals with confidence.</p> <figure role="group"><img alt="&quot;Guests and the graduating class of LEAP 2021 meeting virtually through Zoom. &quot;" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="4931c56d-e7ab-4333-8a70-58e97524a4cd" height="698" src="/sites/default/files/LEAP%202021%20Graduation.jpg" width="1203" loading="lazy" /><figcaption><em>Guests and the graduating class of LEAP 2021 meeting virtually through Zoom. </em></figcaption></figure><p><br /> LEAP 2022 applications close December 14, 2021.</p> <p>Could your child benefit from building confidence and skills in employability and leadership? To register your interest to participate in LEAP 2022 or find out more, visit our <a href="https://www.visionaustralia.org/services/children/leap/register">LEAP website</a> or call Vision Australia on 1300 84 74 66.</p> <p>Join the LEAP 2022 Q&amp;A to meet the LEAP Program Coordinator, LEAP 2021 Graduate Mentors (2020 Graduates), and LEAP 2021 Graduates.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Date</strong></p> <p>Wednesday, December 8, 2021</p> <p><strong>Time</strong></p> <p>Western Australia: 4-5 pm</p> <p>Queensland: 6-7 pm</p> <p>New South Wales, Australian Capital Territory, and Victoria: 7-8 pm</p> <p><a href="https://visionaustralia.zoom.us/j/96037465731" target="_blank">Join Vision Australia Meeting (Meeting ID: 96037465731)</a></p> </div> Mon, 06 Dec 2021 06:02:47 +0000 matt.collins 27601 at https://www.visionaustralia.com.au Vision Australia Gosford is on the move https://www.visionaustralia.com.au/community/news/2021-12-06/vision-australia-gosford-move <span>Vision Australia Gosford is on the move </span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/461" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.mccarroll</span></span> <span>Mon, 12/06/2021 - 09:23</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p paraeid="{2c9c477f-0f1c-4908-b8db-1cc7edd3657d}{172}" paraid="1090600254">Vision Australia is moving to a new and exciting location in&nbsp;Gosford.&nbsp;</p> <p paraeid="{2c9c477f-0f1c-4908-b8db-1cc7edd3657d}{180}" paraid="1737970446">From Monday,&nbsp;January 17 2022, Vision Australia will be located at&nbsp;Suite G02, 40 Mann Street, Gosford. Our current location at 3/237 Mann Street, Gosford, will be permanently closed as of 5pm Thursday,&nbsp;December 23.&nbsp;</p> <p paraeid="{2c9c477f-0f1c-4908-b8db-1cc7edd3657d}{200}" paraid="861548705">Please note, Vision Australia’s Christmas shutdown runs from&nbsp;5pm Thursday,&nbsp;December 23 2021, until Monday, January 10&nbsp;2022.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p paraeid="{2c9c477f-0f1c-4908-b8db-1cc7edd3657d}{212}" paraid="638083990">Between January 10&nbsp;and January 17 2022, Vision Australia staff will provide services via telehealth or appointments in the community.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p paraeid="{2c9c477f-0f1c-4908-b8db-1cc7edd3657d}{218}" paraid="719402452">Our&nbsp;Gosford office phone&nbsp;number will stay the same&nbsp;on&nbsp;02 4321 6700.&nbsp;You can also contact us on 1300 84 74 66 or via email at <a href="mailto:info@visionaustralia.org" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">info@visionaustralia.org</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p paraeid="{2c9c477f-0f1c-4908-b8db-1cc7edd3657d}{239}" paraid="239358142">The new office location&nbsp;is approximately a 700m walk from Gosford train station and is located in close proximity to bus stops on Mann Street.&nbsp;Onsite parking is not available at the new location.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p paraeid="{f9bfac12-6a95-422b-b622-723f85d52f97}{27}" paraid="298892543" xml:lang="EN-US">Our full range of services and supports will be available at our new location and we look forward to continuing to work with all of our clients in the wider&nbsp;Gosford and Central Coast&nbsp;region.&nbsp;</p> <p paraeid="{2bdf09a1-f749-4f89-8f16-4083c353d6b2}{9}" paraid="267334162">If you would like to visit our new location on or shortly after&nbsp;January 17, we ask that you give us a call on&nbsp;02 4321 6700&nbsp;so we can make sure we’re ready for you.&nbsp;</p> <p paraeid="{2bdf09a1-f749-4f89-8f16-4083c353d6b2}{23}" paraid="1717604144">COVID-19 screening and safety measures will also be in place until further notice.&nbsp;</p> <p paraeid="{2bdf09a1-f749-4f89-8f16-4083c353d6b2}{27}" paraid="560077965">If you have any further questions, please get in touch by calling&nbsp;02 4321 6700&nbsp;or via email at <a href="mailto:info@visionaustralia.org" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">info@visionaustralia.org</a>.&nbsp;</p> </div> Sun, 05 Dec 2021 22:23:29 +0000 phil.mccarroll 27596 at https://www.visionaustralia.com.au Studio 1: Podcast and audio description trailblazer Thomas Reid https://www.visionaustralia.com.au/community/news/2021-12-03/studio-1-podcast-and-audio-description-trailblazer-thomas-reid <span>Studio 1: Podcast and audio description trailblazer Thomas Reid</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/107156" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Helen.Velissaris</span></span> <span>Fri, 12/03/2021 - 10:14</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p style="margin-bottom:13px">Thomas Reid was at his prime, working as an IT developer in New York and father of two before cancer changed his life’s trajectory.</p> <p>Retinoblastoma affected his eyesight, losing one eye in 2004, then another 35 years later, leaving him totally blind.</p> <p>Speaking to Vision Australia Radio’s Studio 1, Thomas created his own podcast series Reid My Mind to link others with low vision or blindness.</p> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="c7bee69d-64fb-4973-a5aa-875870956fcc" height="300" src="/sites/default/files/2021-11/8461.jpg" width="200" loading="lazy" /></p> <p><em>Photo: Thomas Reid.</em></p> <p>“Blindness is still a low incident thing that occurs, right?” he told host Matthew Layton.</p> <p>“So you may not have the chance to meet someone [who is blind].</p> <p>“Maybe you meet someone in passing, but you don't have a chance to sit down and meet a lot of people and really get to know them.</p> <p>“And I think the podcast is the way that I want to put that out there.”</p> <p>His love of audio production and technological prowess was exactly the preparation he need to create a great sounding, professional podcast and eventually, developing great audio description.</p> <p>“So there's always some bias in audio description,” Thomas said.</p> <p>“I got involved with audio description to do that right.</p> <p>“To highlight certain things that aren't working, to talk about how we can make it better and to highlight some people doing creative things with audio description.”</p> <h2>Listen to Reid’s full interview in the player below:</h2> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="180" src="https://omny.fm/shows/studio1/thomas-reid/embed?style=cover" width="100%"></iframe></p> <p><em>Studio 1 is Vision Australia Radio’s weekly look at life from a low vision and blind point of view.</em></p> <p><em>To get in touch with the show. Call or text: 0450 078 834 or email studio1@visionaustralia.org.</em></p> </div> Thu, 02 Dec 2021 23:14:02 +0000 Helen.Velissaris 27586 at https://www.visionaustralia.com.au Building diverse workplaces https://www.visionaustralia.com.au/community/news/2021-12-03/building-diverse-workplaces <span>Building diverse workplaces</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/461" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.mccarroll</span></span> <span>Fri, 12/03/2021 - 07:00</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>There is no escaping that COVID-19 has had a colossal impact on Australian workplaces.</p> <p>Yet while the last two years have seen a shift in thinking towards remote working and the need for flexibility, disappointingly there seems to be little change when it comes to including people with disability in workplaces.</p> <p>Although an estimated one in five Australians live with a disability, they are neglected and underrepresented in the corporate environment. </p> <p>Many face unfair barriers including employer attitudes, inaccessible offices or systems, and unsupportive workplaces. Just 24% of Australians who are blind or have low vision are in fulltime employment.</p> <p>Like everyone else, people who are blind or have low vision, or live with any other disability, have a need and desire to work and achieve their professional goals. </p> <p><img alt="A man uses a computer while a female colleague looks over his shoulder " data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="d6b34cf3-df71-452f-b525-790d876dda96" height="333" src="/sites/default/files/05_GUther_Desk_0645_1.jpg" width="500" loading="lazy" /><br /><em>Caption: People who are blind or have low vision have the same desire to achieve their professional goals as anyone else. </em></p> <h2>Disability employment targets</h2> <p>Diversity has been a buzzword attached to employment for several years, yet progress is still slow when it comes to actually building diverse and inclusive workplaces.</p> <p>Recent research by Vision Australia reveals a significant proportion of employers hold negative perceptions about people who are blind or have low vision, including that they’re a burden, unproductive, a health and safety risk, and more. </p> <p>These outdated perceptions are prevalent across workplaces of all sizes in Australia.  A significant portion of employers revealed they had never considered hiring someone who is blind or with low vision.</p> <p>Disappointingly, many said they would be unwilling to change job requirements for someone who is blind or has low vision even if they were fully qualified for the position. </p> <p>What’s concerning is that these attitudes are prevalent when so many workplaces boast of their disability employment targets.</p> <p>Attitudes like this give such targets little chance of success and mean they little more than tokens. It’s long overdue for employers to look inward and ensure they have plans and policies in place to meet disability targets and pay more than just lip service to the ideals of diversity and inclusion.</p> <p><img alt="Two colleagues, one male and one female, walk down a corridor" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="3ea6a484-3416-406e-86c7-3abbcabf41db" height="750" src="/sites/default/files/166.jpg" width="500" loading="lazy" /><br /><em>Caption: Employers need to ensure people with disability are put in the position to fully participate and succeed in the workplace. </em></p> <h2>Our experience </h2> <p>At Vision Australia, we take pride in being a leading national provider of blindness and low vision services and we’re committed to creating a more inclusive workforce through our practice.</p> <p>Of our 800 employees, 15% are people who are blind or have low vision. This ranges from frontline service providers through to departmental managers, all the way to our senior leadership team. </p> <p>We are extremely proud of the workforce we have developed and the work we have done to achieve that. </p> <p>Our 15% figure is a set organisation KPI that our leadership team closely follows and adheres to throughout our employment process. </p> <p>We take an affirmative approach by encouraging blind and low vision people to apply for positions and considering them when they do. </p> <p>Our application portal is also designed to be accessible to those living with a disability to make the process as seamless as possible. </p> <p>But simply hiring someone who is blind or has low vision, or lives with any other disability is of little good if they aren’t put in a position to succeed.  </p> <p>Vision Australia, we strive to support blind and low vision people in the workplace, with our office spaces designed with built environments that meet their needs.</p> <p>Additionally, we provide assistive technology that helps our employees perform their tasks independently. </p> <p>We ensure our staff can continue vital training, such as orientation and mobility by providing additional leave. We’re also constantly educating our sighted staff about what it means to work alongside someone who is blind or has low vision. </p> <p>But organisations like ours should not be the only avenue to a career for someone with a disability. Somebody who is blind or have low vision should feel comfortable and confident they can pursue their career in any workplace across Australia.  </p> <p><img alt="Over the shoulder shot of man using magnification software on a computer" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="ebc99330-1e8e-4e87-9eca-7a490f61e31c" height="332" src="/sites/default/files/VA_010.JPG" width="500" loading="lazy" /><br /><em>Caption: People with disability may use different equipment or processes in the workplace, but that doesn't take away from their ability to contribute to an organisation. </em></p> <h2>A time for real change </h2> <p>Diversity means a different thing for every organisation, whether that’s gender, age, race, or disability, a representative workforce has several benefits. </p> <p>At Vision Australia, our employees ensure we’re meeting the needs of people who are blind or have low vision, and we’re committed to constantly meeting our targets and striving to become more representative. </p> <p>But the word diversity is meaningless unless there is planned action behind it. Without committed processes, policies, or systems in place, you will fail to build a representative workforce that is inclusive of every person. </p> <p>As Australia emerges further out a period of disruption, we must strive to move past tokenistic targets and ensure we are bringing about positive change.</p> </div> Thu, 02 Dec 2021 20:00:10 +0000 phil.mccarroll 27566 at https://www.visionaustralia.com.au Petbarn Foundation receives Vision Australia Award for multi-million dollar support https://www.visionaustralia.com.au/community/news/2021-12-02/petbarn-foundation-receives-vision-australia-award-multi-million-dollar <span>Petbarn Foundation receives Vision Australia Award for multi-million dollar support</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/376" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">matt.collins</span></span> <span>Thu, 12/02/2021 - 15:05</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p style="margin-bottom:13px">More than 100 Australians have a Seeing Eye Dog by their side thanks to Petbarn Foundation and their partnership with Vision Australia.</p> <p>Collaborating since 2014, the partnership has raised more than $5 million to support people who are blind or have low vision.</p> <p>That support has been acknowledged, with the Petbarn Foundation reciving the 2021 Vision Australia Corporate Award.</p> <p>The support of the Petbarn Foundation has been more important than ever in recent years, as Vision Australia navigates the ongoing impacts of COVID-19.</p> <p>Petbarn Foundation manager Janelle Bloxsom said it has been an honour helping Vision Australia and Seeing Eye Dogs to make a difference in the lives of so many people who are blind or have low vision.</p> <p>“To think that over 100 people out there that have a dog by their side, especially during COVID you know, just to have that companionship is something that's really heart-warming,” Janelle said.</p> <p>In 2021, the foundation had a record year, and raised $851,000 via the Puppy Games and Seeing Eye Dogs Appeal.</p> <p>The Puppy Games saw four budding Seeing Eye Dog puppies compete in a series of obstacle courses and events to crown the most well behaved and aspiring Seeing Eye Dog.</p> <p>This year, the award went to Chessy.</p> <p><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tmVswnSmlk4" title="YouTube video player" width="560"></iframe></p> <p>“We had such a great response from the public, and we're already working through how we can make it even bigger and better next year with some new trials or some new obstacles for the puppies to do,” Janelle said.</p> <p>It costs over $50,000 to breed, raise and train each Seeing Eye Dog. The support of Petbarn Foundation helps bring independence and mobility to people who are blind or have low vision.</p> <p><em>First handed out in 2006, the Vision Australia Awards are given in recognition of people and organisations which give up their time and resources to support the work of Vision Australia and the wider blind and low vision community.</em></p> </div> Thu, 02 Dec 2021 04:05:14 +0000 matt.collins 27576 at https://www.visionaustralia.com.au Kate Harry’s puppy caring efforts earn her a Vision Australia Award https://www.visionaustralia.com.au/community/news/2021-12-02/kate-harrys-puppy-caring-efforts-earn-her-vision-australia-award <span>Kate Harry’s puppy caring efforts earn her a Vision Australia Award</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/376" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">matt.collins</span></span> <span>Thu, 12/02/2021 - 14:58</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p style="margin-bottom:13px">Kate Harry has been one of Seeing Eye Dogs’ longest running puppy carers, caring for more than 20 puppies over two decades.</p> <p>All this, she has done voluntarily.</p> <p>“I was enjoying it,” she admits.</p> <p>“You stay there. There's no question about this.”</p> <p>Her dedication is being honoured as a recipient of a 2021 Vision Australia Award announced on October 27.</p> <p>Kate is currently raising Trevor, puppy number 24, and hopes to see him go on and be paired with someone who is blind or has low vision.</p> <p>Each puppy she takes on is a year-long commitment.</p> <p>“I enjoy training, it's not hard work,” she said.</p> <p>“The mission is to just prepare a dog or to be able to help them in any way to navigate where they're going.”</p> <figure role="group"><img alt="&quot;Kate wearing old Vision Australia branding with a puppy she is fostering by her side&quot;" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="4b388a9f-b750-4e21-a161-27ee1c87689d" height="1031" src="/sites/default/files/13119848_997291563691273_3278027904078602691_o.jpg" width="773" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Kate sitting next to one of the pups she has previously cared for.</figcaption></figure><p><br /> Alongside her puppy caring duties, Kate takes on a number of other responsibilities to support her fellow puppy carers.</p> <p>She is part of the Paw Pals committee, which host picnics and walking events for carers. These events that Kate and her fellow committee members organise give carers a chance to socialise and train together.</p> <p>Kate started volunteering at the former Vision Australia Seaford site, then moved to Dandenong in a number of different roles, from book-keeping administration support, to writing letters to referrers, to facilitating social group dinners and now to collection dog organisation.</p> <p>Despite all she’s done for Seeing Eye Dogs, Kate is humble about her impact.</p> <p>“There are an awful lot of other volunteers. I can think of a lot of people that do just the same as what I do.”</p> <p>Kate is part of a large community of Seeing Eye Dogs volunteers. Over 600 volunteers play a part in raising, caring for and training Seeing Eye Dogs for people who are blind or have low vision.</p> <p><em>First handed out in 2006, the Vision Australia Awards are given in recognition of people and organisations which give up their time and resources to support the work of Vision Australia and the wider blind and low vision community.</em></p> </div> Thu, 02 Dec 2021 03:58:27 +0000 matt.collins 27571 at https://www.visionaustralia.com.au Casting callout: positive employment campaign https://www.visionaustralia.com.au/community/news/2021-12-02/casting-callout-positive-employment-campaign <span>Casting callout: positive employment campaign</span> <span><span lang="" about="/radio/user/23" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anne.Obrien</span></span> <span>Thu, 12/02/2021 - 13:58</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>We’re on the lookout for someone who is blind or have low vision, aged 20-30yrs, to be part of a positive behaviour change commercial!</p> <div class="align-center"> <div class="field field--name-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/radio/sites/default/files/casting%20callout.png" width="824" height="291" alt="Text: Casting callout a person who is blind or has low vision" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></div> </div> <p>This campaign is focussed around members of the community who are entering the workforce, so we are searching for a person who is blind, or has low vision, aged approximately 20 to 30 years.</p> <p>Those with limited acting experience are encouraged to apply, as long as you are comfortable delivering lines of dialogue.</p> <p>Please note: this will be a paid campaign.</p> <p>If you’re interested email: <a href="mailto:submissions@northsidecasting.com.au?subject=Campaign: Vision Australia">submissions@northsidecasting.com.au</a></p> <h3>Shoot Date: 21st December 2021</h3> <p>If this is you, or someone you know, please email <a href="mailto:submissions@northsidecasting.com.au?subject=Campaign: Vision Australia">submissions@northsidecasting.com.au</a></p> </div> Thu, 02 Dec 2021 02:58:02 +0000 Anne.Obrien 27581 at https://www.visionaustralia.com.au Talking Vision preview: How music works for blind musicians https://www.visionaustralia.com.au/community/news/2021-12-02/talking-vision-preview-how-music-works-blind-musicians <span>Talking Vision preview: How music works for blind musicians </span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/107156" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Helen.Velissaris</span></span> <span>Thu, 12/02/2021 - 11:04</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p style="margin-bottom:13px">Braille specialist, journalist and soprano Ria Andriani didn’t want to feature heart-warming stories of disabled musicians defying the odds.</p> <p>She wanted to showcase the amazing hacks and tricks they use to make the musical world accessible for themselves.</p> <p>Host of a four-part series How Music Works on ABC Classical, Ria interviews musicians with a disability and discovers the strategies they use daily to make music.</p> <p>“When I came on board with this series, I wanted to focus more on the accessibility side of things rather than the usual inspirational focus that most media has when they're portraying people with disability,” she told Vision Australia Radio’s Talking Vision.</p> <p>Legally blind with congenital glaucoma, Ria interviews the likes of <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/classic/read-and-watch/music-reads/performing-opera-as-a-blind-person/13643872">opera singer Jordie Howell</a> who is blind, to composer <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/classic/read-and-watch/music-reads/making-music-while-living-with-mental-illness/13654082">Damon Smith</a> who lives with obsessive-compulsive disorder and bipolar.</p> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="10eab3d1-4113-4290-b584-f223e23378fe" height="696" src="/sites/default/files/2021-11/abc%20classic%20ria%20and%20jordie.png" width="1494" loading="lazy" /></p> <p>Photo: Ria Andriani interviews opera singer Jordie Howell. (Credit: ABC Classical) </p> <p>Also on the bill is percussionist Tessa Gutierrez, who can drum in a wheelchair and follow along with low vision.</p> <p>“She has a very supportive network of friends who make sure she has line of sight to the conductor and can see her music,” Ria said.</p> <p>Ria hopes the series can tackle the music industry’s bias and rigidity in accepting disabled artists.</p> <p>“We deserve to have different access paths that make it possible to get into auditions and also to perform on stage without having to come up with all the solutions ourselves,” she said.</p> <h3>Listen to the full interview with Ria in the player below:</h3> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="180" src="https://omny.fm/shows/talking-vision-vision-australia-radio/talking-vision-602-week-beginning-29th-of-november/embed?style=cover" width="100%"></iframe></p> <p>You can find the four-part How Music Works series at <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/classic/">ABC Classical online</a>.</p> </div> Thu, 02 Dec 2021 00:04:43 +0000 Helen.Velissaris 27561 at https://www.visionaustralia.com.au Talking Tech: Amazon earbuds review https://www.visionaustralia.com.au/community/news/2021-12-02/talking-tech-amazon-earbuds-review <span>Talking Tech: Amazon earbuds review</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/107156" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Helen.Velissaris</span></span> <span>Thu, 12/02/2021 - 11:01</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p style="margin-bottom:13px">Amazon’s wireless earbuds aren’t going to lock you out of using third party apps.</p> <p>Talking Tech host and Apple fan David Woodbridge has got his hands on the second generation of the Amazon Echo Buds to review, and says he still has access to his Hey Siri functions.</p> <p>“Not only can you actually use them inside the Alexa App, but you can also use them when you’re just using an iOS device or Android device quite normally,” he said.</p> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="dfde8773-81ec-48d2-98ab-a6de0eb81e25" height="454" src="/sites/default/files/2021-11/amazon%20earbuds%202nd%20gen.png" width="1000" loading="lazy" /></p> <p>Photo: Amazon Echo Earbuds, 2nd Generation.  </p> <p>So even when the Amazon Alexa app is closed on your device, the wake word Alexa will still work and help you navigate.</p> <p>The earbuds have the standard tap to start/stop music, twice for next track, and thrice for previous track and include noise cancelling.</p> <p>“I'm finding that the noise cancellation isn't as good as my AirPods Pro, but it could be because I haven't got a really good fit yet,” David admits.</p> <p>Of course, the price point does make for an interesting comparison.</p> <p>The Amazon Echo buds are $199 compared to $399 for the AirPods Pro.</p> <p>Hear the full review in the player below:</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="180" src="https://omny.fm/shows/talking-tech-vision-australia-radio/talking-tech-30th-november-2021/embed?style=cover" width="100%"></iframe></p> <h2>Need some Christmas tech ideas? Watch David’s webinar below:</h2> <p><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Xx6lUQCc2co" title="YouTube video player" width="560"></iframe></p> <p>Hear more tech tips from a blind and low vision perspective every week on <a href="https://radio.visionaustralia.org/podcasts/podcast/talkingtech">Talking Tech</a>, Tuesday 4.30pm AEST or catch up with the podcast via Spotify, Omny, Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts.</p> </div> Thu, 02 Dec 2021 00:01:15 +0000 Helen.Velissaris 27556 at https://www.visionaustralia.com.au Telling their own story: Seven new books by disabled writers https://www.visionaustralia.com.au/community/news/2021-11-30/telling-their-own-story-seven-new-books-disabled-writers <span>Telling their own story: Seven new books by disabled writers</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/461" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.mccarroll</span></span> <span>Tue, 11/30/2021 - 09:46</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p style="margin-top: 16px; margin-bottom: 16px;">The Vision Australia Library is proud to announce a number of new books by writers who are blind or have low vision have recently been added to the library collection.</p> <p>There are also new titles written by prominent disabled writers such as Adam Hills and Kurt Fearnley.</p> <p>While all the writers tell their own unique stories of their lived experience, the common thread is each one of the writers embracing their differences and the determination to live a life on their own terms.</p> <h2>Writers who are blind or have low vision</h2> <h3>Positive vision: Enjoying the adventures and advantages of poor eyesight by Ken Brandt</h3> <p>Poor eyesight never impacted author Ken Brandt's vision of what life could be Whether galloping across the Montana range, exploring claustrophobic (and fiery!) caverns, or taking a plunge from a plane, his adventures are sure to entertain.</p> <p>Available in <a href="https://my.visionaustralia.org/library/detail/book/4303177?format=DAISY_2_AUDIO&amp;previous-title=Search">DAISY audio</a></p> <h3>Blindness for Beginners: A renewed vision of the possible by Maribel Steel</h3> <p>Maribel Steel’s heart-warming story is part memoir, part guide. She demystifies what it means to be blind, and provides a unique set of ‘tools’ to enable you to forge ahead with tenacity. By offering a realistic picture of the possible, Blindness for Beginners will help you to adjust emotionally, adapt in practical ways, and enhance your self-confidence.</p> <p>Available in <a href="https://my.visionaustralia.org/library/detail/book/4326051?format=DAISY_2_AUDIO&amp;previous-title=Search">DAISY audio</a></p> <h3>No Barriers: A Blind Man's Journey to Kayak the Grand Canyon Erik Weihenmayer and Buddy Levy</h3> <p>This isn’t just about Erik Weihenmayer’s dream to kayak one of the world's great rivers as a blind athlete but also the many people he’s encountered along the way who possess what he calls a “no barriers" mindset and who live a “no barriers” life.</p> <h2>Writers with other disabilities</h2> <h3>Pushing the Limits: Life, marathons and Kokoda By Kurt Fearnley and Warwick Green</h3> <p>The boy from Carcoar was raised to believe he could do anything. At fifteen, he won his first medal. Then he conquered the world, winning three Paralympic gold medals, seven world championships and more than 35 marathons. A world-beater in and out of his wheelchair, Kurt is a true champion.</p> <p>Available in <a href="https://my.visionaustralia.org/library/detail/book/4274671?format=DAISY_2_AUDIO&amp;previous-title=Search">Daisy audio</a></p> <h3>Say Hello by Carly Findlay</h3> <p>This forthright, honest and rousingly triumphant memoir by award-winning writer and appearance activist Carly Findlay will challenge all your assumptions and beliefs about what it is like to have a visibly different appearance. This is both a moving memoir and a proud manifesto on disability and appearance diversity issues.</p> <p>Narrated by the author, Say Hello is available in <a href="https://my.visionaustralia.org/library/search#rm">DAISY audio</a></p> <h3>Late Bloomer: How an autism diagnosis changed my life by Clem Bastow</h3> <p>With wit and warmth, Clem reflects as an autistic adult on her formative experiences as an undiagnosed young person, to working as an entertainment journalist in Hollywood. Along the way she challenges the broader cultural implications and ideas around autism, especially for women and gender-diverse people.</p> <p>Available in <a href="https://my.visionaustralia.org/library/detail/book/4303591?format=DAISY_2_AUDIO&amp;previous-title=Search">DAISY audio</a></p> <h3>Best Foot Forward by Adam Hills</h3> <p>Adam Hills was a quiet primary school kid with a prosthetic foot who did all his homework and only spoke when spoken to. When he did speak, he made sure he was funny. This charming and witty memoir offers a lesson in following your heart, hard-work, staying positive and discovering that what makes you different also makes you unique</p> <p>Available in <a href="https://my.visionaustralia.org/library/detail/book/2851381?format=DAISY_2_AUDIO&amp;previous-title=Search">DAISY audio</a></p> <p><strong>Not a member of the Vision Australia Library? Membership is free and available to anyone with a print disability. Find out more at the Vision Australia Library <a href="https://www.visionaustralia.org/services/library/join/online-library-membership-application">webpage</a> or call 1300 654 656.</strong></p> </div> Mon, 29 Nov 2021 22:46:56 +0000 phil.mccarroll 27551 at https://www.visionaustralia.com.au